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Northside Business Walk

Northside - Madison Business Walk

Click Here to Read the Report

Presented By: City of Madison and Madison Gas and Electric

The City of Madison Office of Business Resources and Madison Gas and Electric partnered with the Northside Planning Council, Northside Economic Development Coalition, Northside Business Association, Northside News and the Madison Region Economic Partnership to present the first Northside Business Walk on September 8, 2016.

A Business Walk is an economic development initiative that, in a short amount of time, allows local leaders to get the pulse of how a business community is doing. The premise behind each walk is to “locate the successes and obstacles the local business community is facing and then track that information and provide assistance.”
In total 47 business and civic volunteer's were divided into 12 different groups (two to three people per group) + 3 large employer groups. The 47 volunteers visited 146 businesses in three hours.

                  Their conversation was focused around five basic questions:

·       How’s Business?

·       What do you like about business on the Northside?

·       What can be done to improve business on the Northside?

·       Will your business be affected by the closing of Oscar Mayer?

A few members from the business walk planning committee.

A few members from the business walk planning committee.

BusinessWalk3.jpg
Business and Civic Volunteers - Training for the Business Walk

Business and Civic Volunteers - Training for the Business Walk

Business and Civic Volunteers - Training for the Business Walk

Business and Civic Volunteers - Training for the Business Walk

Business and Civic Volunteers - Training for the Business Walk

Business and Civic Volunteers - Training for the Business Walk

Business and Civic Volunteers - Training for the Business Walk

Business and Civic Volunteers - Training for the Business Walk

Mayor Paul Soglin

Mayor Paul Soglin

Business Walk

Business Walk

Business Walk

Business Walk

Business Walk

Business Walk

Thank you Willy Street - Co-op North for being our bag sponsor!

Thank you Willy Street - Co-op North for being our bag sponsor!

Each group was assigned a specific area, 12 areas + three large employer groups.

Each group was assigned a specific area, 12 areas + three large employer groups.

When the business walk was completed, 40 companies were followed up with directly. These companies addressed needing additional help or mentioned a major problem to the volunteers. The City of Madison Office of Business Resources coordinated the City’s response to a number of municipal issues brought up by business owners. The Engineering Department, Madison Police, Community Development and Economic Development Departments were connected to the businesses owners and ongoing follow-up is occurring.

The Northside Economic Development Coalition and the Northside Business Association look forward to collaborating with the City of Madison and other economic development partners on Northside projects for the next one to two years and using the report to guide these efforts.

A final report with the business walk findings will be added to the blog very soon. Here are a few pictures from the event.

 

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Community Blueprint - Business Walks - PART 2

(Click Here for Part 1)

How does it work?
The program features a half-day blitz of a business community by trained volunteers who ask business owners/managers a very short list of four questions (see below).

a.)   How is business?
b.)  What do you like about doing business in your area?
c.)   What can be done to improve doing business in your area?
d.)  Would you like someone to follow up with your company after the walk?  

This brief format allows for 100-200 businesses to be reached in two to three hours. A typical half -day Business Walk will include breakfast/registration, training for the volunteers, a business walk in the community, lunch, and a debrief session.  Overall, coordination of the event from start to finish typically takes two to three months.

Why?
The Business Walk Program helps communities create a unified voice and build a stronger relationship between the business community and local government. The program has also initiated change of burdensome regulations, created crime prevention programs and the 3/50 project. But most importantly, it has allowed communities to target and assist companies at risk: saving them from going out of business, relocating to another community, and saving local jobs. Contact Blueprint Events to see how the Business Walk Program can jump start your community’s business retention and expansion efforts!    

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Mayor’s Summit on Entrepreneurship

Mayor’s Summit on Entrepreneurship
Presented by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation
Honorary Host: Mayor Paul Soglin, City of Madison

This half day conference hosted national and local speakers who addressed the state of the startup environment in the Madison Region. They spoke about successes as well as opportunities to improve and there was great discussion created around challenges entrepreneurs face in Wisconsin. Some would say "the event started off with a bang and ended with a bang" (see Cap Times article).

The event was featured in the Cap Times:  http://host.madison.com/ct/business/technology/tools-for-spurring-startup-growth-scrutinized-at-madison-entrepreneur-summit/article_3ba5c89f-03d9-510f-8df5-8233f549a687.html

Welcome Remarks: Mayor Paul Soglin, City of Madison

Welcome Remarks: Mayor Paul Soglin, City of Madison

Welcome Remarks: Mayor Paul Soglin, City of Madison

Welcome Remarks: Mayor Paul Soglin, City of Madison

Mayor’s Summit on Entrepreneurship

Mayor’s Summit on Entrepreneurship

Presentation on the Kauffman Index: Evan Absher, Program Officer, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Presentation on the Kauffman Index: Evan Absher, Program Officer, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Presentation on the Kauffman Index: Evan Absher, Program Officer, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Presentation on the Kauffman Index: Evan Absher, Program Officer, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Panel Response: Paul Jadin  , President, Madison Region Economic Partnership, (moderator),   Tricia Braun, Deputy Secretary & COO, WEDC (left),  Zach Brandon, President, Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce (middle) and   Tom Still, President, Wisconsin Technology Council (right)

Panel Response: Paul Jadin, President, Madison Region Economic Partnership, (moderator), Tricia Braun, Deputy Secretary & COO, WEDC (left),  Zach Brandon, President, Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce (middle) and Tom Still, President, Wisconsin Technology Council (right)

Panel Response: Paul Jadin  , President, Madison Region Economic Partnership, (moderator),   Tricia Braun, Deputy Secretary & COO, WEDC (left),  Zach Brandon, President, Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce (middle) and   Tom Still, President, Wisconsin Technology Council (right)

Panel Response: Paul Jadin, President, Madison Region Economic Partnership, (moderator), Tricia Braun, Deputy Secretary & COO, WEDC (left),  Zach Brandon, President, Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce (middle) and Tom Still, President, Wisconsin Technology Council (right)

Mayor’s Summit on Entrepreneurship

Mayor’s Summit on Entrepreneurship

Mayor’s Summit on Entrepreneurship

Mayor’s Summit on Entrepreneurship

Presentation on Entrepreneurial Activities Across the U.S.: Rhett Morris, Director, Endeavor Insight

Presentation on Entrepreneurial Activities Across the U.S.: Rhett Morris, Director, Endeavor Insight

Panel Response: John Biondi,   Director, Discovery 2 Product (D2P)   (moderator), Troy Vosseller, Co-Founder, gener8tor (left), Dude Frank, Co-Founder & CTO, Comply365 (middle), and   Wes Garnett, Co-Founder & CEO, Kurbi Health (right).

Panel Response: John Biondi, Director, Discovery 2 Product (D2P) (moderator), Troy Vosseller, Co-Founder, gener8tor (left), Dude Frank, Co-Founder & CTO, Comply365 (middle), and Wes Garnett, Co-Founder & CEO, Kurbi Health (right).

Panel Response: John Biondi,   Director, Discovery 2 Product (D2P)   (moderator), Troy Vosseller, Co-Founder, gener8tor (left), Dude Frank, Co-Founder & CTO, Comply365 (middle), and   Wes Garnett, Co-Founder & CEO, Kurbi Health (right).

Panel Response: John Biondi, Director, Discovery 2 Product (D2P) (moderator), Troy Vosseller, Co-Founder, gener8tor (left), Dude Frank, Co-Founder & CTO, Comply365 (middle), and Wes Garnett, Co-Founder & CEO, Kurbi Health (right).

The room was filled with a mix of business and civic leaders as well as entrepreneurs from all over Wisconsin. The discussion ended with business leaders and policy makers thinking about what they can do to help create a more successful entrepreneurial ecosystem in our state. One thing for sure... the conversation definitely does not and should not stop here.

Make sure you #createyourownblueprint for every event you do.

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Community Blueprint - Business Walks - PART 1

What is a Business Walk?

A Business Walk is an economic development initiative that, in a short amount of time, allows local leaders to get the pulse of how a business community is doing. The information gathered is then used to help advocate for the business community as a whole, and is also used by economic professionals to identify which businesses require further outreach.

Why were Business Walks developed?

The initiative was created because economic development professionals realized there was a need for Business Retention and Expansion (BRE) on a large scale. However, many economic development organizations simply lack the time and resources to do it all alone. To that end, Business Walks can be used to help you quickly identify individual businesses, which are facing threats and/or opportunities, thereby necessitating further contact to direct them to appropriate resources. The program was developed not to replace traditional BRE outreach but to enhance it, serving as an entry-level opportunity for BRE efforts.

Part 2: How does it work? Why have one in your community?

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Working The Room - Networking

I have planned and attended hundreds of networking events. So I can tell you that there are two types of people who network.

1.     Person A: Walks in and finds the first familiar face. 

2.    Person B: Scopes out the room, creates a plan, and then proactively tries to interact with new people with the intention of helping their business or someone else’s business.

Let me first say this: there is no “correct” way to network. Person “A” might have intended to only talk to colleagues or friends. In that case, mission complete. With that said, if you are person “A” and want to become person “B,” here is some advice to help you make the most of your time and effort.

1.     Set Expectations Before You Go: Do you want to make new connections to help build your business? Are you looking for new clients? Are you looking for mentors in your field? Are you going to support a cause or see a new space? Or is it a combination of a few of these things? Time is money so it is important to make sure you understand why you are attending an event. Then think of creative ways to craft your elevator pitch around your expectations.

2.     Set A Goal For Yourself: Depending on the size of the event and what your expectations are, you should always set a goal for yourself. This will help you stay focused. A few examples would be… “meet three new people” or “talk to one new person in every corner of the room”. If you find yourself at an event where you know a lot of people already, you might set a goal of “introduce two people to someone else you know”. I think this is a “lost art” in a society where a lot of people only think about themselves. There is power in helping others make connections.  As they say… what goes around comes around.  

3.     Using Your Business Card Correctly: The key to having a business card is only giving it away with purpose. Don’t hand your business card to someone unless you really want to connect. If someone wants to connect with you, they will ask for your card. A tip, that has helped me in the past, is writing on my card where we met. As you can see below, I have a space for it on my card (even if you do not, you can still write it someplace on the card). It will help them remember you and then they are more likely to reach out and connect with you after the event. Also if your goal is three new contacts, keep three business cards in your hand when you walk in. Tell yourself… you can only leave when you have given them away.

Good luck and feel free to contact me if you have any questions. Make sure you #createyourownblueprint in everything you do.

Business Card

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